Archive for February, 2006

Soundcard problems

Monday, February 27th, 2006

For the past few weeks I’ve had no sound coming from my computer. I switched over from having sound support built in to the kernel to loaded as modules, and everything worked fine. Then, just to be sure, I re-ran the configuration… and it broke. Every single step in the guide I was using worked fine, with no errors at all or anything, until the part where you were supposed to hear sound, which I didn’t.

Lack of an error message is a pain to work with, so I couldn’t find any way to fix it. I went through the guide several times, it didn’t get fixed. I upgraded kernels and alsa tools, nothing helped. I asked on forums, no one knew.

So today I tried everything again, and then went and searched the alsa-user mailing list archives. And there I found the solution to my problem: switch a rather buried, nowhere-mentioned pref to change the output from digital to analog, since it can only do one at a time.

So hopefully this post will come up on google for anyone having the same problem as me. If you have a Soundblaster 2 Audigy (ZS (Platinum (Pro))), which uses the emu10k1 driver, and you’re not getting any sound, but you have no error messages either, and you’re sure everything’s turned on and unmuted and turned to a good volume, then scroll way over in your alsamixer preferences, and find the thing labelled “Audigy Analog/Digital Output Jack”, and unmute it.

Now that the Olympics are (practically) over…

Sunday, February 26th, 2006

Short track speed skating is the most awesome winter olympic sport ever.

Fastback

Saturday, February 18th, 2006

So I’m reading the comments of a fastback memory usage post on Ben Goodger’s blog, and people are saying they rarely use the back button more than one or two times in a row, and storing 8 pages is maybe a little excessive.

And I just realized, I often use it not once or twice or eight times, but twenty or more. You see, I have a few html-based games I play, and when I’m moving around a map I can be loading over a page a second. And when I want to, say, go back and see the results of the last battle, that can be quite a few pages back even though it happened less than a minute ago.

Contradict that to slashdot where I open each story to read in a new tab and never use back at all, or google where, if I think I know what page I’m looking for but I’m wrong, I use it exactly once at a time. All in all, I think it’s pretty obvious that with such a wide range of usage even from just one person!, some sort of pseudo-intelligence is needed here.

As a disclaimer, I’ve never noticed any memory problems at all, though. Perhaps that’s because I have a gig of RAM and use Linux, and Linux’s memory management and multitasking/multi-userness generally pwns Windows’.

I need to stop lurking

Tuesday, February 14th, 2006

I really must start posting on www-html more, instead of just reading. As far as I can tell, the HTML WG hasn’t released a good spec since HTML 4. (And that I only count “good” as it was an obvious improvement over HTML 3.2; everything since then has been stagnant or worse in terms of good design.

Also, I need to post to the WHATWG list more, too. While it’s making definite improvements with HTML 5, it still doesn’t separate documents from application UI. That makes it “relatively good” as HTML 4 was, and non-relatively probably the best spec of its type there ever has been, but still not good enough.

(This post prompted by something Anne said.)

Localized content vs. localized presentation of content

Sunday, February 5th, 2006

Which is better: localized content, or localized presentation of content?

For example, which is better:

  • Serving

    <span class='date'>February 2rd at 8:30 PM EST</span>

    to me, and equivelant things to other users, or

  • Serving

    <style>.date{binding:datelocalizer.xbl;}</style>
    <span class='date'>2006-02-03T01:30Z</span>

    to all users

Documents

Friday, February 3rd, 2006

What is the semantic difference between the following:

  • <html xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
    <head>
      <title></title>
    </head>
    <body>
      <p>This is a paragraph.</p>
      <object>
        <svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' viewBox='0 0 2 2'>
          <circle cx='1' cy='1' r='1' fill='lime'/>
        </svg>
      </object>
    </body>
    </html>
  • <html xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
    <head>
      <title></title>
    </head>
    <body>
      <p>This is a paragraph.</p>
      <svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' viewBox='0 0 2 2'>
        <circle cx='1' cy='1' r='1' fill='lime'/>
      </svg>
    </body>
    </html>
  • <svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' viewBox='0 0 2 2'>
      <foreignObject>
        <p xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>This is a paragraph.</p>
      </foreignObject>
      <circle cx='1' cy='1' r='1' fill='lime'/>
    </svg>
  • <svg xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' viewBox='0 0 2 2'>
        <p xmlns='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>This is a paragraph.</p>
      <circle cx='1' cy='1' r='1' fill='lime'/>
    </svg>

(Feel free to correct my SVG, but that’s not what the question is about.)

Faster Scrolling

Wednesday, February 1st, 2006

Weird. I just noticed that with the new frame painting stuff from Bug 317375 even though most scrolling has slowed down, Hixie’s blog, which was always slow, has sped up tremendously. How strange.

div

Wednesday, February 1st, 2006

div, in current markup languages, has two uses:

  • Page structure, for grouping and separating parts of the page (e.g. separating the document from the template)
  • Document structure, for grouping and separating parts of the document when there is no more specific element

The end.